Cinderella ~ Mitchell Arts Centre

Star rating: ****

Mitchell Arts Centre is playing host to a two week run of the popular fairy tale classic, Cinderella, this Christmas and it’s as traditional a pantomime as you can get – with a very current and highly comedic script thrown in for good measure.

Pantomimes around the country appear to be adapting their stories to make the principal females feistier and Tim Churchill and Paul Wood’s version is no exception. There are nods to well known television shows such as Gogglebox and Jeremy Kyle as well as a brand new take on the age-old pantomime comedy song ‘If I was Not a…’.

With a simple yet highly effective set providing an elegant and practical backdrop for the action-packed show, we were treated to a good dose of musical numbers which included the hit of the year from ‘The Greatest Showman‘ – ‘This Is Me’, ‘Make Your Own Kind of Music’ by Paloma Faith and naturally we had to join in with ‘Baby Shark‘, the gimmick tune of the season. The strong cast interacted brilliantly with the audience, offered opportunities for the crowd to participate and kept a remarkable level of energy going given their numerous two show days and the fact they’ve had one day off to enjoy Christmas before getting back to it!

Cathy O’Reilly made the perfect Fairy Godmother, not only did she look the part, there was a twinkle in her eye and her vocal ability, which we’d not previously heard – simply stunning! She’s a joy to hear. Tim Churchill, who not only co-wrote the show but also directed it, is well known to us as Mr Lyons and other characters in the Blood Brothers tour. As an Ugly Sister he positively shone and was every inch the pantomime dame as he carped, sneered and appeared to enjoy every minute. He was joined by Paul Deakin as his sister and together they were a menace and hilarious in equal measure. Their names were apt too, Theresa and May! Amy-Jane Ollies is another face who’s become familiar to us as part of the Blood Brothers ‘family’ and in the title role of Cinderella, she was every inch the rags to riches girl. Her comic timing was particularly notable and naturally her sensational singing voice lent itself to the role, she had lovely chemistry with Matthew Dye as Buttons and Robert Dearn as Prince Charming. Dye did a great job of getting the audience involved while Dearn had a superb double act going on with Liam Wakeford as Dandini. In this incarnation, Prince Charming and Dandini were reminiscent of Ant and Dec and it worked fantastically. Den Siegerstz from BBC Radio Stoke completed the line up as Baron Hardup, making his panto debt. He may not have been as overtly natural in panto-land as his co-stars but it was clear he was enjoying his first official role and how wonderful that his daughter is part of the Hanley Babes who appeared in the show too.

There is so much to enjoy in this traditional pantomime, relevant political jokes for the grown ups, a cast who come across as being one big happy family themselves and plenty of magic along the way to entertain the young ones. The parting shot which sums up how well the show was received by our four year old? “I want to be in this show when I grow up”. You can’t say fairer than that can you? Oh no you can’t!

Book your tickets here: https://mitchellartscentre.co.uk/

Advertisements

My Top 10 Performers ~ 2017

Performers on stage… I’ve seen a few, but then again… no I’ve definitely seen a few and I’m full of admiration for so many of them. So, who made my top ten this year? Well I’ve had a difficult time whittling the list down but the top ten have each impressed me in ways that have continued to resonate as the year has worn on. Here we go, in no particular order!

Claire Machin ~ I think that The Girls has to be my favourite West End show of 2017 and although it didn’t make my top 5 shows list, it’s still up there as one of the highlights of my theatre-going calendar. I think Claire Machin was one of the crowning glories in that show and she’s also one of my favourite interviewees ever. I urge you to see this amazing lady on stage if you can, her voice, her tenacity and her energy are all infectious. She’s a star.

Daniel Taylor ~ I’ve seen this man in three different guises this year and excels in each of them. Whether he’s imitating Tommy Cooper, spitting and whining as Sammy in Blood Brothers are donning a pair of high heels and mocking Cinderella – he’s an actor de force and will always have my support. Amazing performer and one of the best I’ve seen in a long time, not just in 2017.

Michele Dotrice ~ She’s been one of my favourite on screen actors for years and years, however seeing her in The Girls (twice!) has cemented her as one of my stage favourites too. She can sing, she has comic timing in abundance and she whipped her kit off live on stage too – my hero! I would say I’d like to see more of Michele on stage, however….!

 

Graham Martin ~  I’ve always admired Graham’s ability to play multiple roles in Blood Brothers to an extremely high standard (to the point where I feel the show wouldn’t be the same without him), but he also impressed me in The Hollow at Stoke Repertory Theatre. I’m only sorry to have missed his performance as the King in pantomime this year. Graham’s one of the finest triple threats in my humble opinion.

Sarah Jane Buckley ~ Sarah Jane was my first ever favourite soap star, I’d not really had a favourite character in any of the soaps prior to Kathy Barnes rocking up in Hollyoaks and stirring things up. Sarah Jane is my favourite Mrs Lyons in Blood Brothers too, however this year I also had the chance to see her play Mrs Johnstone when she stepped in for Lyn Paul. She was absolutely sensational, I could wax lyrical forever. I’ve also finally seen her in pantomime this season, which was another amazing experience. There’s nothing Sarah Jane can’t do, she’s a natural in every genre of performance.

Tim Churchill ~ Another Blood Brothers star who is my favourite Mr Lyons for sure, but who also starred in Stoke Repertory Theatre’s The Hollow and showed another element to his acting talent. It’s given me a taste of what other roles he would lend himself to, a very talented actor.

Cathy O’Reilly ~ I was really impressed by Cathy’s performance in The Hollow at Stoke Repertory Theatre, she can convey so much without words and the movement and fluidity she put into the role has stuck with me. She’s a talented actor who I’m keen to see perform in other roles in the future. I believe she would be able to play a variety of characters, this introduction has been the tip of the iceberg.

Sean Jones ~ I’ve watched Sean as Mickey in Blood Brothers many, many times and he is inspirational in the role. I feel every nuance of emotion in his performance. So he most definitely makes it to my list because he’s the best Mickey in my favourite musical. I also saw him in as Silly Billy at in Sleeping Beauty Rhyl Pavilion Theatre and he was amazing. Completely reminiscent of my favourite comedy stars whom I grew up watching with comic timing to rival any stand up comedian.

Amy Thompson ~ Amy was on my radar on Channel 5 as a Presenter on Milkshake! because I have a three year old, however last year I was blown away by her performance as Sleeping Beauty at Malvern Theatres. This year, I’ve watched her in the role again and she wowed me all over again, so for her sheer triple threat ability – she’s one of my top performers of 2017.

Robert Daws ~ I’ve always rated Robert Daws, another actor who began as an on-screen favourite then blew me away with his stage roles. How The Other Half Loves was an excellent fit for him, he conveys so much without words and embodies every character he portrays. I highly recommend catching him in a theatre production, I was only sorry not to have been able to have seen How The Other Half Loves again.

 

 

The Hollow ~ Stoke Repertory Theatre

The Hollow ran at Stoke Repertory Theatre until Saturday 12th August, look out for more from United National Theatre Productions, soon.

Star rating: ****

Not one of Agatha Christie’s quickest paced stories, The Hollow has always been an arduous story for me to engage with, personally. This production was no different from that perspective, however this is completely attributed to the script and not the performances or overall presentation of the piece.

The set instantly transported the audience to the 1938 grandeur of Sir Henry and Lady Lucy Angkatell’s estate. It offered splendour and the perfect backdrop for murder and intrigue, plenty of exits for swift, hasty retreats, too. The introduction of the various characters, basically compiled of suspects-to-be and victim(s)-to-be was time consuming yet necessary and I instantly enjoyed the chemistry between Sir Henry (Guy Siner) and Lady Lucy (Jenny Hanley). The pair appeared to steer the action between them and the combined experience of Siner and Hanley did not go unnoticed. Siner was superb as the bumbling gentleman of the manor, despairing of his ever matchmaking wife, whom Hanley portrayed brilliantly.  So, with a Christmas gathering arranged, cousins aplenty arriving to stay (Edward (Nigel Peever), Henrietta (Cathy O’Reilly) and Midge (Suzanne Kendall)), together with Dr Christow (Tim Churchill) and his anxious wife, Gerda (Deborah Cornock), it’s only a matter of time before someone is due to exit stage left before the second half. There’s also the small matter of a well known American actress who has taken a cottage merely yards away, Veronica Craye (Annie Bailey) and has history with the good Doctor. As does Henrietta with whom Dr Christow is having an affair. Of course, once the inevitable murder takes place, there’s always the suspicion as to whether the Butler did it – in this case the all-seeing Gudgeon (James King) or indeed whether Inspector Colquhoun (Graham Martin) is all he’s cracked up to be.

Tim Churchill plays the rather cocky Doctor with bolshiness and just enough humility to gain some sympathy, albeit short-lived. I felt that Nigel Peever played Edward interestingly, with a combination of a chipper happy-go-lucky persona versus a very unhappy man. Graham Martin picked the pace up when he appeared as the Inspector in Act Two and spoke volumes with his facial expressions. Annie Bailey made for a sultry Veronica Craye and Suzanne Kendall played Midge in ideal stark contrast, shy, timid even, yet incredibly frustrated. One of the stand out performances emulated from Deborah Cornock as Gerda, a complex role indeed, with more layers than it may initially appear. Cath O’Reilly is also one to watch, her performance as Henrietta was incredibly engaging and had me guessing til the end.

I’m looking forward to the next production, And Then There Were None and I’m delighted that David Mansell will direct this too, he certainly has an eye for the nuances of Christie’s work. A thoroughly enjoyable experience at the theatre.

 

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: